Integrated Catchment Management

Land

Erosion in upper catchment

Erosion in upper catchment

Introduction

Rainfall is strongly modified by the land on which it falls. Vegetation and soils retain, absorb, and retard rainfall as it travels to streams and rivers. Consequently, the characteristics of rain "flow" differ substantially from the characteristics of river flow.

Similarly, the chemical composition of rain water changes as it comes in contact with vegetation, soils, and rocks on its way to rivers. It makes sense then, that different types of vegetation, soils, and rocks should influence the quantity and quality of river water differently. This will be true no matter how the land is used. However, it is also clear that if the same land is used differently - for example, as farm land rather than native bush - one might expect the quantity and quality of river flow to differ in response. Some of these change may be acceptable and others may not.

Deciding how changes in the land will affect the characteristics of streams and rivers - and the coastal areas into which they flow - is a difficult task. It is especially difficult if the land characteristics and the land use patterns are complicated, as is almost always the case in large regions.

Successful management of these challenges requires an appreciation for a wide range of physical, biological, and chemical processes and the ways in which they interact.

The purpose of this theme in our programme is to develop a firm understanding about the influences that past, current, and future land uses have on the quantity and quality of water in the Motueka River.

Researchable Issues

Research Areas

Lower reaches of the Motueka River valley Forest harvesting

Lower reaches of the Motueka River valley

Forest harvesting


Publications (Selection)

Year Title File Size
2002 How do native riparian plants grow?  
2009 Motueka Forest sediment study: data report July 2006 to June 2008 and analysis of sediment yield pdf       1.32MB
2003 Recharge of Moutere aquifers: a report into investigations on recharge mechanisms. pdf       1.48MB
2000 Stabilising–Parameters of Vegetation: A Critical Look Down–Under. pdf       143KB
2005 New Light on Streamwater Sources in the Glendhu Experimental Catchments, East Otago, New Zealand. pdf       391KB
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Presentations (Selection)

Year Title File Size
2006 Afforestation and water yield: the New Zealand experience. pdf       452KB
2005 Modelling Landslide Occurrence. pdf       2.49MB
2005 What Cross-Section Surveys tell us about River gravel movement and Understanding Sediment Movement sediment research directions in the ICM programme. pdf       322KB
2006 Advances in understanding bed level trends and gravel volume changes in the Motueka River. pdf       378KB
2002 How old is groundwater in the Upper Motueka catchment and what does age say about groundwater?  
More presentations on this topic »
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Primary Contacts:


Image - Les Basher Les Basher  EmailSend email to BasherL
Phone: 03 545 7708
Fax: 03 546 1082
More details»
Institute
Landcare Research
Expertise
Soil science, geomorphology, erosion processes
Image - Tim Davie Tim Davie  EmailSend email to tim.davie
Phone: 03 372 7084
Fax: +64 (0)3 365 3194
More details»
Institute
Environment Canterbury
Expertise
Hydrology & modelling, surface water resource management
Image - Andrew Fenemor Andrew Fenemor  EmailSend email to fenemora
Phone: 03 545 7710
More details»
Institute
Landcare Research
Expertise
ICM programme management; local liaison; resource management; hydrology and water resource management
Image - Chris Phillips Chris Phillips  EmailSend email to phillipsc
Phone: +64 3 321 9775
More details»
Institute
Landcare Research
Expertise
Erosion processes, slope stability, effects of forestry, catchment management, knowledge management
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Page last updated Tuesday, 7 August 2007

Research areas

Dating groundwater Farm environmental planning Fine sediment: bringing the geomorphology and biology together Forest harvesting effects Gravel extraction Mechanisms of groundwater recharge Riparian classification Riparian vegetation assessment Riparian vegetation enhancement River bank styles Sediment generation, delivery and impacts Stabilising characteristics of native plants Tall vegetation effects on water yield Upper Motueka water resources Water augmentation

Research Highlight

FRST research reviews Native plant roots Native plant trials in the Sherry River – how are they going? Sherry River water quality improvement Tracing Sediment from the mountains to the Bay